Tested: The top 5 solar generators of 2023

|

Updated

Best solar generators
Several companies now make excellent portable solar generators to help you keep your life running while off the grid.

A solar generator is an incredibly useful tool that consists of a portable power station and one or more solar panels. This setup allows you to move around and still have lots of electricity ready to power appliances and devices.

But, not all solar generators are created equal. They’re not all meant for the same purpose, either. Each system has different energy storage capacities, output ports, and maximum power ratings.  Some are small and can be carried to remote locations to run a few devices. Some larger systems are meant for carrying in an RV, providing days’ worth of off-grid energy storage and power for medium-sized appliances.

No matter how you plan to use a solar generator, at least one will be a great fit for your needs. We tested a dozen of the latest and greatest portable power stations on the market in 2023 and came up with the five best solar generators:

  1. Best portable: EcoFlow RIVER 2 Pro
  2. Best large portable: Anker SOLIX F2000 (PowerHouse 767)
  3. Best affordable: OUPES 1200
  4. Best feature-rich: EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max
  5. Best overall: Bluetti AC300 + B300

Now, let’s look at each of our winners and discuss what makes them the best at what they do!

How much will a solar battery cost you?

Why you can trust SolarReviews:

SolarReviews is the leading American website for consumer reviews and ratings of residential solar panels and solar panel installation companies. Our industry experts have over two decades of solar experience combined and maintain editorial independence for their reviews. No company can pay to alter the reviews or review scores shown on our site. Learn more about SolarReviews and how we make money.

Best portable: EcoFlow RIVER 2 Pro

The EcoFlow River 2 Pro packs a lot of punch into a portable footprint.

The EcoFlow RIVER 2 Pro is a small wonder. Weighing in at 17.8 pounds and with 768 watt-hours (Wh) of energy storage, the RIVER 2 Pro packs the most energy per pound of any power station we tested. That’s a great data point, but this battery has a lot more to offer.

Key stats

EcoFlow River 2 Pro  
MSRP $549
Capacity 768 Wh

Max Continuous Output

800 W
Weight (as tested) 17.8 lbs
Dimensions (HxWxD)
8.9 x 10.6 x 10.2 inches
Max solar input
220 W
AC outputs
3-prong outlet: 4
DC outputs

Cigarette lighter: 1

5521 port: 2

USB outputs

USB-A: 3

USB-C: 1

USB-C input
Yes, 100 W
Warranty
5 years, 3,000 cycles
Additional features
Fixed carry handle, adapter-free AC input, app control via Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, X-Bopst up to 1,600 W output

We love that the RIVER 2 Pro can charge from AC power without an adapter and via USB-C or DC input from solar panels or vehicles. That’s some serious versatility! EcoFlow’s app experience is also second to none, allowing users to see usage statistics and control things like charging speed, device sharing, and X-Boost output. 

Speaking of X-Boost, it allows the RIVER 2 Pro to put out up to 1,600 watts at a time, so you can use this tiny little battery to run a power-hungry appliance like a tea kettle if you need to. Although with only 768 Wh, you should do that only once or twice before a recharge.

At 17.8 pounds, the RIVER 2 Pro can go a lot of places and is the perfect weekend companion for car campers, shore fisherpeople, drone enthusiasts, and anyone who needs to keep a few devices charged up in the wild. Pair with EcoFlow’s 220W bifacial solar panel for a solar generator that can recharge with a full sun day.

Best large portable: Anker SOLIX F2000 (PowerHouse 767)

The Anker PowerHouse 767 lets you bring serious power wherever you’re headed.

The Anker PowerHouse 767 is large and in charge, with just over 2 kWh of energy storage in a really cool, rollable form factor. With a collapsible pull handle and heavy-duty wheels, this thing is like a giant YETI cooler, except instead of beverages and ice, it’s filled with go-juice that makes all your electronics come alive.

When paired with solar panels, Anker re-brands the PowerHouse 767 as the SOLIX F2000, but the names are essentially interchangeable.

Key stats

Anker SOLIX F2000 (PowerHouse 767)  
MSRP $1,999
Capacity 2,048 Wh

Max Continuous Output

2,400 W
Weight (as tested) 67.5 lbs
Dimensions (HxWxD)
15.5 x 9.8 x 20.7 inches
Max solar input
1,000 W
AC outputs

3-prong outlet: 4

TT-30R outlet

DC outputs

Cigarette lighter: 2

5521 port: 0

USB outputs

USB-A: 2

USB-C: 3

USB-C input
No
Warranty
5 years, 3,000 cycles
Additional features
Retractable pull handle, adapter-free AC input, large hard plastic wheels, front light, TT-30 Port for RV, control via Bluetooth, expandable up to 4,096 Wh

The 2,400 W continuous output of the PowerHouse 767 means you can run power-hungry appliances like microwaves, coffee makers, electric kettles, hair dryers, and more. And the added portability features make it possible to run them all on the go. The TT-30R allows you to plug an entire RV into the PowerHouse and keep it running for days off the grid with up to 1,0000 W of solar charging.

If you also need a battery to keep smaller devices charged, it’s no problem for the PowerHouse 767. Anker’s PowerIQ fast-charging technology adjusts its output to quickly charge compatible devices, including iPhones, iPads, and Android devices from Samsung, Motorola, and more.

In our testing, we used the PowerHouse767 to run our video team’s entire setup on location for a full day, with lights, cameras, and microphones all running on the battery. Despite all the use we got out of it, there was still energy left at the end of the day. If you need more than 2 kWh, Anker offers the 760 expansion battery, which adds another 2,048 Wh to the package.

Best affordable: OUPES 1200

The OUPES 1200 is as good as power stations that cost twice as much.

Even though nobody seems to know how to say OUPES (does it sound like “opus” or rhyme with “hopes”?), we definitely know that we’d recommend their products to anyone looking for a quality solar generator. The OUPES 1200 is our favorite of their lineup, with the perfect match of price, features, and storage capacity.

Key stats

OUPES 1200  
MSRP $549
Capacity 992 Wh

Max Continuous Output

1,200 W
Weight (as tested) 24.3 lbs
Dimensions (HxWxD)
13 x 11.4 x 8.7 inches
Max solar input
240 W
AC outputs
3-prong outlet: 3
DC outputs

Cigarette lighter: 1

5521 port: 2

USB outputs

USB-A: 2

USB-C: 2

USB-C input
No
Warranty
2 years, 3,500 cycles
Additional features
Fixed carry handle

For people who need a way to power small appliances and keep devices charged away from the grid, the OUPES 1200 offers the best bang-for-the-buck of any power station we tested. At just $0.55/Wh, it’s a screaming deal, and you can often find it for less than its $549 MSRP.

The total price is the same as the EcoFlow RIVER 2 Pro but with more storage and higher output. There are some tradeoffs, however; with the OUPES, you give up app control, USB-C charging, one AC outlet, and two years of warranty. OUPES does still claim a 3,500-cycle lifespan until the battery drops to 80% of its usable capacity, and it should last that long—you just don’t get warranty coverage for that whole time. 

Adding an OUPES 240-watt portable solar panel will just about double the cost of your investment but turns this battery into a self-recharging wonder that can keep you off grid for several sunny days.

Overall, we’re ultra impressed by the OUPES 1200’s design, performance, and usability. At this price, there is no competition among the portable solar batteries we tested and even a bunch that we didn’t. You should check out the OUPES 1200 if you're a value-conscious consumer.

How much does solar-plus-storage cost near you?

Best feature-rich: EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max

The EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max does it all and can go the distance in the field.

The EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max is truly one of the most full-featured portable power stations on the market. Boasting just over 2 kWh of storage in a compact 52.2-pound package, the DELTA 2 Max is the champion of fast charging, versatility, and compact expandability.

If you’re looking for a portable power station with enough outlets and power output for your whole family, the DELTA 2 Max is a great option.

Key stats

EcoFlow Delta 2 Max  
MSRP $1,899
Capacity 2,048 Wh

Max Continuous Output

2,400 W
Weight (as tested) 52.2 lbs
Dimensions (HxWxD)
12 x 19.6 × 9.5 inches
Max solar input
1,000 W
AC outputs
3-prong outlet: 3
DC outputs

Cigarette lighter: 1

5521 port: 2

USB outputs

USB-A: 2

USB-C: 2

USB-C input
No
Warranty
5 years, 3,000 cycles
Additional features
Fixed carry handles, app control over Bluetooth and wi-fi, X-Boost mode up to 3,400 W of continuous output, super fast charging from solar plus AC, EcoFlow smart generator support, expandable up to 6,144 Wh

The EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max is an incredibly feature-rich portable battery. It can charge from AC and a solar input simultaneously, it can run and charge just about every device and appliance most people need, and you can control it remotely with the EcoFlow app. You can even set it to recharge automatically from one of EcoFlow’s fossil fuel generators for extended off-grid trips.

In our testing, AC and solar inputs simultaneously charged the battery from empty to full in just over an hour. That’s a seriously impressive level of charging, and like EcoFlow’s other products, there is no giant power brick here, just a simple three-prong cord to plug into the wall.

Imagine keeping all your devices powered for a few days off grid and then being able to top up the battery from grid power in the time it takes to have lunch. 

With EcoFlow’s X-Boost technology enabled, we could run a 1,500-watt space heater and a 1,500-watt tea kettle simultaneously. There is only 2 kWh of storage, so you wouldn’t want to do that very long, but we verified that you could. 

If you did want to run more high-wattage appliances for longer, you can choose to add up to two EcoFlow DELTA Max Smart Extra Batteries. Each Extra Battery holds an additional 2,016 Wh, or you can add an EcoFlow Smart Generator, which integrates with the DELTA 2 Max to charge it whenever it gets to a level you specify in the app. 

Speaking of appliances, EcoFlow makes portable refrigerators and air conditioners that also integrate with the DELTA 2 Max and can be controlled via the app. We told you this thing was versatile, right?

When it comes to solar panels, the DELTA 2 Max has two XT60I inputs, each of which runs to an MPPT charge controller capable of handling up to 500W of input (11-60V at 15A).

Best overall: Bluetti AC300 + B300

The Bluetti AC300+B300 can power an off-grid cabin or RV for days and offers ultimate flexibility.

Now we come to the grand finale! Simply put, the Bluetti AC300 + B300 combo offers the most power, storage, and expandability of any battery we tested.

If you need big-time power for off-grid applications, maximum solar input, expandability, and UPS functionality to keep essential appliances running in a power outage, the AC300 + B300 combo is your best option.

Key stats

Bluetti AC300 + B300  
MSRP $3,299
Capacity 3,072 Wh

Max Continuous Output

3,000 W
Weight (as tested) 132 (48.1 + 83.9) lbs
Dimensions (HxWxD)
24.6 x 20.5 × 12.5 inches
Max solar input
2,400 W
AC outputs

3-prong outlet: 6

TT-30 outlet: 1

DC outputs

Cigarette lighter: 2

5521 port: 0

USB outputs

USB-A: 4

USB-C: 1

USB-C input
No
Warranty
4 years, 3,500 cycles
Additional features
Fixed carry handles, two-part body, app control over Bluetooth and wi-fi, UPS mode with ~20ms switchover time, expandable up to 12,288 Wh, split-phase 240V available with additional AC300

At 132 pounds, the AC300 + B300 push the bounds of “portability,” but thankfully, the two pieces are separate, so the heaviest thing you’ll ever have to lift is the 83.9-pound B300. Both pieces have fixed carrying handles, making it easy for two people to share the load.

The weight is worth it - this Bluettie system has over 3 kWh of energy storage, six 3-prong AC outlets, a 30-amp RV outlet, and USB-A and -C ports. Plus a feature unique to Bluetti among the power stations we tested for this article: dual 15W wireless phone charging pads.

The pure sine wave inverter in the AC300 can put out up to 3,000 watts of continuous power and surge to 6,000 watts to start motors in things like power tools and air conditioners. The AC300 can accept up to 2,400 W of solar input and can charge the B300 from both solar and the grid at the same time, with a combined input of up to 5,400 W. The AC300 + B300 can also be set to charge from a backup fossil fuel generator automatically.

The sheer amount of power output and input makes the AC300 + B300 combo the very best choice for off-grid cabins, tiny houses, RVs, remote worksites, and even live music events. A continuous output of 3,000 W isn’t enough to run a full-sized house, but it’s a serious amount of power for people with more modest off-grid needs. 

If you have a sunny rooftop or ground-mount array where you can fit 6 full-sized 400-watt solar panels, you can keep appliances—including air conditioners, coffee makers, TVs, hair dryers, tools, and more—running off the grid indefinitely, as long as the days remain sunny. 

You can add up to three additional B300 batteries for a total of 12,288 Wh (nearly as much as the Tesla Powerwall). If you need more than 120V power, Bluetti offers a combiner called the Fusion Box that allows you to connect two AC300s with at least two B300 units together in a split-phase 240V configuration, doubling the continuous output to 6,000 W. This is truly a battery that can provide emergency home backup power and also go on the road for extended trips in a large vehicle.

For people with mission-critical appliances like computers and medical devices, the AC300 offers a UPS mode with ~20 ms switchover time, which can be programmed via the app to take advantage of multiple modes, including normal UPS (grid backup), time control (to run from batteries only when grid power is expensive), and PV priority (to charge the battery from the grid only up to 30%, and the rest only when solar panels are producing power).

As you can tell, the Bluetti AC300 + B300 combo is the most capable, expandable battery we’ve reviewed here. It’s bigger than all the other options but is truly the best choice for people serious about power away from the grid.

Want a home battery system?

Testing methodology

We tested these batteries in and around our main office in New Jersey, testing their physical aspects (weight, dimensions, materials) as well as their ability to output power to devices, charge from AC and solar, and do other things people need these batteries to do every day. 

We also brought each battery to various locations in the New Jersey countryside, testing their ability to deliver power away from grid connections. This real-world testing proved vital in forming our opinions about which was the best battery for each category.

A note on prices: We list the manufacturer’s suggested retail prices (MSRP) for each battery, but if you’ve spent any time shopping for these batteries, you’ve probably noticed that they’re rarely offered at full price. Every manufacturer seems to have sale prices varying from 10% to 40% off for Memorial Day, Labor Day, Prime Day, or any given holiday; or even for no reason at all. In the interest of simplicity, we weren’t interested in using then-current sale pricing to compare these batteries, and keeping up with the sale prices would be a significant part-time job for any one person. When evaluating batteries, check pricing and use that to guide your final decision.

Other solar generators we tested

Aside from the five solar generators mentioned above, we also tested the following portable batteries:

  • Bluetti EB55
  • Bluetti AC180
  • Anker PowerHouse 521
  • Anker PowerHouse 555
  • OUPES 600
  • OUPES 2400

All of these batteries worked great, but the top five listed above rose to the top in their respective categories. As time goes on, we hope to test many more batteries from the top brands in the industry, including Jackery, GoalZero, and Renogy.

A note on battery chemistry: All portable solar generators we tested use LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery cells. LFP is an extremely safe, stable, long-lasting, and non-toxic battery chemistry compared to other chemistries. LFP cells make a battery a bit heavier than some alternatives, but these cells have no risk of thermal runaway and last around seven times as long. We only considered LFP batteries for our ranking.

Bottom line: How to choose the best solar generator for your needs

How do you know whether you can get by with an ultra-portable solar generator like the EcoFlow RIVER 2 Pro or a giant 3-kWh Bluetti AC300 + B300 combo? You have to consider your essential needs carefully, find out how many watts your most power-hungry appliances would draw, plan out how long you need to use them for, and what kind of recharging you can do during that time.

That might sound like a lot of work, so here’s a general guideline: if all you need is to keep a few smartphones and a laptop charged for a weekend, a small portable battery like the Bluetti EB55, EcoFlow RIVER 2 Pro, or OUPES 600 will do the trick.

If you need to run higher wattage appliances during a weekend trip, like hair dryers, coffee makers, and refrigerators, you’ll be looking for something more like the EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max, Anker PowerHouse 767, or Bluetti AC180.

Finally, if you need to have your larger appliances on an extended trip away from the grid, consider the Bluetii AC300 + B300, or look into expansion batteries for the EcoFlow DELTA 2 Max or Anker PowerHouse 767. Each of these companies also offers portable solar panels that can be mounted in any sunny spot to add hundreds of watt-hours per day in extra capacity.

Whatever your needs; there is an option out there that will work for you. We’re lucky to have several companies making excellent portable solar batteries that can help keep our essential devices and appliances running miles away from any power lines.

 - Author of Solar Reviews

Ben Zientara

Solar Policy Analyst and Researcher

Ben Zientara is a writer, researcher, and solar policy analyst who has written about the residential solar industry, the electric grid, and state utility policy since 2013.

Related solar news